4 Painters With Killer Atmosphere

4 Amazing Artists Who Create Stunning, Moody Atmosphere

I’ve said before that I’m inspired by haze and fog. I think it’s the power of the mysterious that makes it so compelling. I look at it and try to figure out what else is there that I’m not seeing. But I know what I am seeing is the most important thing for me to look at right now.

There are several painters who do a really good job of creating this moody, foggy, hazy ambience in their paintings. Here are four. Well, three. The fourth one creates a mood, but not through atmosphere.

J. M. W. Turner

JMW Turner - Eruption of Vesuvius - 1817 JMW Turner - Eruption of Vesuvius - 1817
James McNeill Whistler - Nocturne in Black and Gold: The Falling Rocket, 1875Smog was already a problem in London in Turner’s day (1775-1851), and his hazy work inspired Monet and Whisler, most notably Turner’s “Nocturne in Blue and Gold: the Falling Rocket” (1875) which resulted in Whisler’s libel suit with art critic John Ruskin.

Maurice Sapiro

Maurice Sapiro "Mauve And Gold" oil on canvas 20"x20"

Maurice Sapiro “Mauve And Gold” oil on canvas 20 × 20 in

Maurice Sapiro "Sunset, Reflected" 38 x 32 in

Maurice Sapiro “Sunset, Reflected” 38 × 32 in

I discovered Maurice Sapiro on Pinterest a few years ago and have been just blown away by this prolific painter. His landscapes (waterscapes?) are an explosion of reds and oranges accented with tiny bursts of turquoise.

Shane Miller

Shane Miller is a friend of mine. He lives and works in the Nashville area, and lately has been covering his paintings with beeswax, which further increases the misty, milky feel. I plan on visiting his studio soon. He paints from his imagination.

Edward Hopper

hopper6

hopper_early-sunday

hopper_rooms-sea

Now this is a different kind of mood. Hopper’s paintings don’t have the hazy, atmospheric quality of the others mentioned above. There’s something rather lonely about them. His paintings often convey a palpable tension that makes me wonder what Steinbeck would have created if he had been a painter from the east coast instead of a writer from California. It would probably be a lot like Hopper’s work.

Where Do I Fall?

Brad Blackman, 2014. Percy Priest Sunrise, Oil on panelGood question. I have done a painting that I feel looks like a bad copy of Sapiro’s sunset piece shown above. One thing I can say is that painting haze of thing is a lot harder than it looks. Although you try watching a Bob Ross video on Netflix or YouTube to see how to lightly drag a fan brush over wet paint to smooth it out a bit. 🙂